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Based on the considerations of the concept group, OpenSCENARIO 2.0 is proposed to be founded on the concept of a domain-specific language (see Methodology and Language Concepts chapters in the concept document), that should support all levels of scenario description, from the very abstract to the very concrete in a suitable way.

The OpenSCENARIO 2.0 concepts take proven features and capabilities of OpenSCENARIO 1.0, like its event-based scenario execution model, and place them in a more general and expressive language framework, to serve as the foundation for both incremental improvements and more revolutionary enhancements.

In comparison to OpenSCENARIO 1.0, a more detailed set of actions and attributes for the relevant simulation models shall be defined to allow for a more comprehensive scenario description and to improve exchangeability. This is addressed by the introduction of a domain model (see Concept document chapter: Architecture).

Beyond such improvements, the proposed domain-specific language supports the creation of more complex scenarios through flexible composition and parametrization of component scenarios in ways that allow realistic, emergent behavior to occur. This is expected to enable massive testing and verification of new, complex hardware and software systems, and their interaction with the complex environment of driving.

The concept group believes that the proposed concepts and direction will enable OpenSCENARIO 2.0 to supply a step-function in its ability to describe full, complex simulations and/or tests, addressing all the required elements, and utilizing existing building blocks (like OpenDRIVE or OpenCRG).

As stated above, the foundational concept of OpenSCENARIO 2.0 is to establish a domain specific language of a declarative nature. A declarative language describes what should happen on scenario execution (including the required parameterization/variation), rather than how to do it. A declarative language can also have a _dual interpretation_, i.e. provide a single scenario description which can be used to describe both how to make it and how to monitor that it _indeed_ happened. This is important if we want to condition some operation on the fact that some other scenario has happened before, without having to describe in detail _how_ to cause that scenario.


The Concept document is using M-SDL language to demonstrate all the concept. It is expected to examine if this language can serve as the foundation of the standards.

Provide a detailed description, how the identified usecases, features or issues (as per preceding chapter) shall be solved or implemented through the proposed project. Descriptions shall include, if applicable:

* Components of a system, which shall be standardized
* Features or functionality of the standardized components
* Method of standardization
* Potentially donated IP from member companies
* Toplevel requirements to be considered for developing the standard
* Statements about backwardcompatibility towards earlier versions of the standard
* Improvements & benefits of the changes as compared to earlier releases of the standard
* Assumptions

The technical content description shall be understandable for readers with an engineering background, but with no specific domainexpertise. Consequently, a brief technical introduction may be needed.